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Labor Markets and Firm Benefit Policies in Japan and the United States 

by: Ogura, Seiritsu; Tachibanaki, Toshiaki; Wise, David A.
Source: The University of Chicago Press 

This paper presents finding from our most recent research on the transformation of participatory employment practices of Japanese firms in the 1990s, during which the Japanese economy slowed down considerably. The operation appears to be of particular public policy interest for many countries considering participatory employment practices as a way to improve their productivity performance and thus competitiveness.

As Levine and Tyson (1990) suggest, relatively higher job security and strong group cohesiveness (supported by the compression of wage and status differentials) of workers in large manufacturing firms in the postwar Japanese economy point to an industrial relations system favorable to successful employee-participation. Moreover, relatively more rapid and stable growth, lower unemployment, and stable financial corporate grouping (banks and institutional shareholders as stable, long-term suppliers of capital) point to an external environment favorable to successful employee participation.


Details

Link: Labor Markets and Firm Benefit Policies in Japan and the United States 
Publication Date: 2003-08-18
Pages: 26